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Communication | Jochen Pohl

Quality never goes out of vogue

The strategic conception and design of an ad campaign in fashion magazine Vogue

sieger design developed a high-quality visual identity and series of cutting-edge ad concepts for Idar-Oberstein-based jewellery designer Jochen Pohl in 2010. The various motifs have appeared at irregular intervals in the fashion magazine Vogue. Designing these motifs is part of an overarching graphic design project, the results of which have been continuously appearing in other magazines and contexts ever since the initial publication.

In the words of Zsa Zsa Gabor, “I’ve never hated a man so much that I’ve returned his diamonds to him.” The message behind her tongue-in-cheek comment is this: precious stones are highly coveted, beautiful and valuable. And it isn’t just women who fall under their spell, the magic of which is difficult to convey in a two-dimensional image – just one of the factors that had to be taken into account when designing the ads. sieger design developed a series of exceptional images for its long-standing client, and the intention is to continue using them to perfectly convey the unique elegance of individual pieces well into the future.

A conscious effort was made to shoot each image separately and tailor it to what Jochen Pohl likes to call the individual ring’s “personality”. The first ad to be run in the magazine drew subtly on the iconic imagery of previous motifs, with subsequent ads each providing a new take on the concept of a ring – whether as a result of photographing a certain piece as a negative or the strikingly playful large-format portrayal of one of the featured gemstones’ diamond-shaped facets. The photographer Ernesto Martens turned a sieger design image idea into reality to create the most recent motif, employing an extreme contre-jour effect against a dark surface to give the image a structured yet mystical feel.

The new ad campaign aims to showcase the quality and individuality of these exclusive pieces in an emotive way, with the classic white passepartout giving each one of the diverse range of images the required sense of space and cohesion. One way of gauging the campaign’s success is to take a look at the number of follow-up projects it’s spawned. These include posters, high-quality in-store display elements and trade fair invitation cards.